Honouring Our History

This is Day 7 of my Write 31 Days series for 2017: 31 Days of Kintsugi.
For an index of all the posts in the series, click here.

photo-256887_1280

“You cannot amputate your history from your destiny, because that is redemption.”
(Beth Moore)

I think most of us have times when we wish we could leave the past behind, that we could move on from the circumstances that have hurt us, the decisions we regret, the perceptions that others have of us that we wish could be altered.

And of course, when we come to Jesus, our past is dealt with: “The old life is gone; a new life has begun!”  (2 Corinthians 5:17 NLT)  We are different people- free to move forward, not bound by the chains of our past experiences or choices.

However, our history is not to be forgotten entirely.  The final principle of Kintsugi that we will be exploring this week is that it honours history.  In repairing an item in such a visible way, it honours the fact that brokenness and repair is part of the object’s history.  We are not meant to completely forget, or ignore, our past.

I like how this clip from The Lion King illustrates that:

There are events in our lives that we can’t forget or “get over” and I don’t think God expects us to.  We can know his healing so that these areas no longer cause us such pain, but often these are events which have shaped us and they will continue to have an influence.

I think we have a choice about how they influence us.  We can let pain from the past cause us to become bitter and angry.  We can hold on to grudges and let our past experiences hold us back from enjoying all that God has for us in the present.  We can allow ourselves to be held captive by fear

Alternatively, we can learn from the past.  We can allow our pain to be the place where we encounter God’s healing, we can let it develop compassion in us to help others, we can appreciate all that God has brought us through and the good things we have today.

Often pain and growth are so intertwined that they are impossible to separate.  I know that I don’t want to forget the past because to do so would be to forget God’s work in my life and the testimony that, even in times of pain, his love is stronger.

I don’t understand why God allows certain things to happen, but I would rather believe that the events of our lives, even the painful ones, can be worked into his plan for good, than believe that our history is to be hushed up and glossed over as if it is something God is unable to use.

31 Days of Kintsugi button

 

Advertisements

10 thoughts on “Honouring Our History

  1. One of the best things I ever did, now that I am terminal, was not preserving the past.

    I can live the present, without the temptation to open a scrapbook to those days that were unquestionably better…at least they didn’t hurt so much, and I thought, then, that I had a future.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I LOVE these kintsugi messages so much, Leslie. You really make me feel less alone. 🙂 I am so with you in this – “I would rather believe that the events of our lives, even the painful ones, can be worked into his plan for good, than believe that our history is to be hushed up and glossed over as if it is something God is unable to use.” Love and hugs!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I LOVE this: In repairing an item in such a visible way, it honours the fact that brokenness and repair is part of the object’s history. We are not meant to completely forget, or ignore, our past.

    So true! I often say the past is part of what has made me who I am today. I wouldn’t be who I am without it. Brokenness and healing are a part of our history for sure.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks, Christy! I think God can use our pasts in ways we don’t expect. We might not see it for a while but he can work good even from the bad things there and sometimes as we look back we can see that.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s